Irrepressable Lawsonia Links

The Links course at The Golf Courses of Lawsonia has>>>

The unique Links course at The Golf Courses of Lawsonia is as fun and memorable as any of the newer superstars in Wisconsin. (Photo from lawsonia.com)

Suddenly, Wisconsin has become a powerhouse golf destination, as unlikely a place for extraordinary public play as Nebraska has become on the private side.

The state hit the big stage in 1988 when Pete Dye built Blackwolf Run’s original 18 at Destination Kohler. That begat another 18 holes and, several years later, 36 more for the resort at Whistling Straits, including the famous Straits Course on bluffs overlooking Lake Michigan.

Erin Hills thrust Wisconsin deeper into golf’s spotlight when it hosted the U.S. Open in 2017, the same year the first 18 at Sand Valley Golf Resort opened, designed by Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw (followed by a second course from David Kidd). These 126 holes, all within a few hours of each other, rival any other state’s collection of public courses.

That’s not even counting The Links at The Golf Courses of Lawsonia, a stunning preserve of classical architecture built in 1930 by William Langford and Theodore Moreau that’s equal to if not better than any of them.

The left side of the 1st green drops away over 10 feet into a bunker, a motif that will be repeated on nearly every hole.

The left side of the 1st green drops away over 10 feet into a grass bunker, a motif that will be repeated on nearly every hole.

Lawsonia, a public course located in a rural, underpopulated area about 80 minutes west of Kohler (there’s a newer 18-hole course on property as well), is much more modest than its more extravagant company but not less memorable. Seemingly locked in time, the Links is a constellation of large, tilting green pads spaced across a spacious sylvan property, the first nine rising and falling through corridors of an old dairy farm, the second looping around a more level open field.

The course is remarkable for the tenacity and consistency of the shaping, a spectacle of high sharp shoulders and steep grass walls. The greens, especially those cut into slopes, have a side that usually offers an acceptable miss and one that’s deadly, with deep trench bunkers falling 10 or more feet below the putting surface. I don’t know if Langford typically built greens like this, but if I were an architect I’d rip this style off as much as I could for its simple, splendid effectiveness.

The uphill 4th, a long par-3, requires requires a tee shot up and across a deep front bunker, or a hooking runner played out to the right.

The uphill 4th, a long par-3, requires requires a tee shot up and across a deep front bunker, or a hooking runner played out to the right.

Just a smattering of these masculine greens would make an impression. Placing such contrast in virtually every green complex, however, creates the kind of brash, binding thematic element that separates good and great courses, or at least confident design from cautious. This is architecture with purpose and a clear point of view.

You also have to play shots into them. Mimicking the sloping, kicking character of the land, the putting surfaces present cant and broken levels rather than oceanic movement. The plain, bold visage of their contours and surrounding hazard implores you to analyze from afar before pulling a club.

The drive at the 6th, one of the course's best par-4's, must carry the berm to release down a slope.

The drive at the 6th, one of the course’s excellent par-4’s, must carry the berm to release down a slope.

It results in a clear but delicate pitch into a green bisected into lower left/upper right sections.

It results in a clear but delicate pitch into a green bisected into lower left/upper right sections.

Having 18 aesthetically vivid and intimidating greens nearly inoculates Lawsonia Links from any charge of weak holes. Nevertheless the run around the upper bend from the par-4 6th to the sweeping par-5 9th, including a par-3 (the 7th) that rivals any one-shotter in the state for distinctiveness, is worthy of special mention.

There aren't many par-3's like Lawsonia's short 7th. The story goes that an old railroad car on-site couldn't be removed, so they built the hole on top of it.

There aren’t many par-3’s like Lawsonia’s short 7th. The story goes that an old railroad car left on-site couldn’t be removed, so they built the hole on top of it.

Crossing a small road that heads down to Green Lake takes you to the long par-3 10th presenting a mammoth fortress green that’s pitched seriously from back to front. This kicks off a homogenous, high energy series of holes that circle through the prairie grasses of the second nine, interrupted briefly by a saunter into an elevated wooded section surrounding the 13th green and the jewel par-3 14th.

No place to miss either left or (especially) right at the enchanting par-3 14th.

No place to miss either left or right at the enchanting par-3 14th.

From there the course rings home around the perimeter with three excellent, tough par-4’s and a gorgeous par-5 that manages to integrate everything you’ve just experienced.

There’s so much to recommend at the Links. A superior, walkable natural property. The absence aggrandizement or of anything not pre-existing or golf related. Affordable green fees ($35-$95). And most importantly, an architectural beauty with an iconic set of green complexes.

If you’re coming to Wisconsin for golf, you won’t see the very best in the state unless you visit Lawsonia (94).

The Golf Courses of Lawsonia — Links Course

Green Lake/Fond du Lac

Architects: William Langford and Theodore Moreau

Year: 1930

 

The rolling par-5 18th culminated a tour through the grassy field of the second nine, and of one of the most joyous rounds you're likely to find in Wisconsin.

The rolling par-5 18th punctuates a tour through the grassy field of the second nine, and also one of the most joyous rounds you’re likely to find in Wisconsin.

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